Vladimir Putin farce as Russian commanders KILLED while ‘taking risks’ to show off | World | News

With the invasion of Ukraine now in its second week and several thousand Russian troops killed, the attack plan seems to be turning into a farce for the president. A convoy of Russian trucks, tanks and armored vehicles about 40 miles long has been stationed outside Kiev for a few days.

At least three senior officers are said to have lost their lives as they sought momentum to advance Russian invasion plans.

The commander of the Seventh Airborne Division, Major General Andrei Sukhovetsky, who was also deputy commander of the 41st Combined Army, was shot dead by a Ukrainian sniper.

A division commander, as well as a regiment commander, also both died in the conflict.

An unnamed Western official told the Telegraph: “We see commanders being killed.

“My assessment would be that these commanders were killed because they had to go closer and closer to the front.

“The reason this is happening is that commanders feel they need to go further to gain greater momentum and control over operations.

“It may be an indication of a certain degree of frustration, of a certain lack of progress and they try to impose their personality on the battlefield and then put themselves in danger.”

The Russian army has so far “failed the operation” and the fierce resistance of the Ukrainians has had a “psychological impact on the Russian troops”, the official said during a press briefing.

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As Russian airstrikes and shelling begin to destroy large parts of Ukrainian cities, former British army chief General Sir Nick Carter said it would make it easier to defend Ukrainians as more posts would become available.

The retired general said Moscow would need twice as many troops to attack such positions as to advance across open ground.

If more Russian troops enter these areas on foot, it is believed that the conflict will see Ukrainian fighters turn to guerrilla warfare as the insurgency grows.
Sir Nick said: “I suspect they will demolish whatever towns they choose to attack and I fear Kiev is an obvious target in this area.

“But what history has proven is that once you destroy a city, it becomes much harder to take it because you have to get up close and personal to knock your enemies out of buildings.

“And it’s really tough if you ransacked the place with artillery,” the general said in a podcast to The Economist.

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Sir Nick added: “So it becomes a very bloody affair and the ratio of attackers to defenders has to be much higher than it would be on open ground.

“In the open, three to one is considered the ratio you need to win.
“In urban areas, it can be up to six to one.”

Several reports have emerged showing demoralized Russian soldiers in tears as they surrender to Ukrainian forces.

Other sources showed that the Russian vehicles had run out of fuel, with soldiers accompanying the vehicles saying they did not know where they were going.

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The Russian president called on NATO to prevent Ukraine from joining the alliance, as well as to call for a withdrawal of NATO forces in Eastern Europe.

Additionally, Putin has declared recognition of two breakaway states in eastern Ukraine and claims the country’s invasion is a “special operation” aimed at demilitarizing and denazifying Ukraine.

Sir Nick ended by saying: “It is quite clear that Mr Putin cannot win.

“No puppet or Russian-backed government would ever have the legitimacy to rule Ukraine.

“He cannot afford to occupy Ukraine indefinitely.

“It’s going to be a quagmire.”